Kajsa Hartig

A blog about Cultural Heritage and Digital Communication


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#MuseumWeek is approaching #Blogg100

MuseumWeek2015 (kopia)

March 23 to 26 more than 1 000 museums from 44 countries are participating in the Twitter event #MuseumWeek. I encourage all museums to join, for the following reasons:

  • To get better at managing a Twitter account
  • To get to know the Twitter audiences
  • To test the museum organisation and the readiness to participate online
  • To have a dialogue with curious online museum audiences
  • To think twice about the museum’s digital identity
  • To be inspired and find new ways to communicate and mediate heritage
  • To increase the museum’s readiness to produce online content
  • And most of all: The break daily routines and have fun 🙂

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Blog post 14/100 #Blogg100-challenge

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Surprise me #Blogg100

Watching the Eurovision Song Contest is a tradition in many Swedish families. And of course, I’ve written about it before. Yesterday was the final contest in Sweden, the time to nominate the song that will be represent our country in the ESC in Austria in May .

The winner was Måns Zelmerlöw. Perhaps not the most amazing song in my opinion, but an excellent performance. The singer was interacting with an animated character. Also not the most innovative idea perhaps, but it was executed in a perfect way, that was totally different from every other competing song. A surprise, and an entertaining moment. Obviously he won.

Take away: Show something that the audience have never seen before, and do it with emotions, with humor and passion and do it in a flawless manner. There you go, the recipe for the successful museum.

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Blog post 13/100 #Blogg100-challenge


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A changing workplace: Part I #Blogg100

Browsing around looking for interesting reading on digital transformation I stumbled upon the report New Ways of Working, by The B-Team. It addresses drivers and key changes at the workplaces. One of the key changes concerns learning:

Previously, employees would be invited to training sessions at a certain time where learning was ‘pushed’ upon them, and then sent back to work. For generations who are growing up sourcing knowledge through search engines as and when they need it, and accessing Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs), this will seem unnatural.

Allowing for a more flexible learning in the workplace is just one of many key changes. Another is the need for digital skills. Skills aimed for the social digital era are listed in the report:

  • Transdisciplinarity
  • Cognitive Load Management
  • Virtual collaboration
  • New media literacy
  • Design mindset
  • Sense making
  • Novel & adaptive thinking
  • Cross Cultural competency

The list is an important reminder that New media literacy is just a part of newly required skills. And that digital transformation, requires several other skills and competencies that have to be acquired across time. And as new skills are required and even expected, the more important the flexible learning environments that encourage and reward key-changes.

However it isn’t only about employees’ skills. It is also about a new leadership that supports innovation. Digital transformation has to take place throughout the organisation (which isn’t surprising of course), and to achieve that it is important to map all the areas in need for digital transformation. The ‘New Ways of Working” report is a great start.

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Blog post 12/100 #Blogg100-challenge

 

 


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Keep calm and write 100 blog posts – again #Blogg100

keep_calm_blog

So tonight I just will not have time to write a decent blog post. And I’m not even inspired to write a simple post, or to share other people’s content. My thoughts on the blog challenge so far this year:

  1. Yes i DO need a content calendar, as I have for accounts that I manage for others, and it’s not that time consuming to create one. No 1 on my to do-list.
  2. It’s certainly tempting to work more with other people’s content. Curating, commenting and re-blogging. And why shouldn’t I? There are so many brilliant people out there already producing great content.
  3. I should spend time planning, when I have time, not when I am too busy to even think about content.
  4. Writing intensely each day is a valuable lesson and it is a boost to develop thoughts on social media and museums.

 

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Blog post 11/100 #Blogg100-challenge


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How to encourage visitor photography #Blogg100 #museweb


Visitor photography matters. This museums goes all in.

The trend to acknowledge and embrace visitor photography is vital for all museums. To what extent it can be encouraged varies of course depending on the museum. The issues with selfie sticks have to be resolved. But the benefits are undoubtedly many, and I would urge all museums to further explore the possibilities of visitor photography.

The Art in Island museum in the Philippines creates environments for the visitor to enter, and a possibility to create personal narratives that includes the museum. The settings encourage visitors to act in a playful way. It’s humour and it’s fun!

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Blog post 10/100 #Blogg100-challenge


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Content and storytelling – are museums ready for it? #Blogg100

I think we all agree that museums are made for storytelling. The endless first hand sources of passionate, tragic, engaging and joyful stories cannot be found outside the heritage sector. Objects, documents and images are there to authenticate and enhance the stories. And digital isn’t new to museums, on the contrary. Today there are museums in the front line of digital innovation, and there are museums that aren’t quite yet there.

Regardless, the path to successful cross media storytelling is more challenging than anticipated. It’s about a number of things:

  • Digital and visual literacy
  • Communication skills across the organization
  • Social media skills
  • Storytelling skills
  • Knowledge-making – producing new knowledge from original sources
  • A clear overall communications strategy
  • Transparency and honesty
  • Regular and timely posting

And a few more things. Then it is also about:

  • Image editing and visual communications skills
  • Knowledge of copyright and Creative Commons
  • Long term planing for campaigning
  • Re allocating resources within the museum for content production and communication
  • Experts – whose expertise is communicated
  • Reallocating money for sponsored posts and premium services
  • Evaluation

But the most disruptive changes are probably:

  • Rethinking exhibition processes – to tie the stories across media together
  • Knowing the audiences – I mean really knowing (embrace Post Demographic mapping of audiences)
  • Mapping and mastering the public facing echo systems
  • Transforming the organization to better face the challenges of outreach in a social digital world
  • Working in cross departmental groups with many different skills
  • Real time communication – dialogue and responsiveness, not just scheduled content
  • Creating seamless experiences between online and onsite
  • Staying ahead – to be prepared for changes

Museums are storytellers, but in a traditional sense, primarily through exhibitions and printed books. The step towards truly mastering digital within the organization seems always almost out of reach, though tremendous progress is being made. What will it take to adapt to social digital? And is it an ongoing process that will never end, only evolve?

These are some first thoughts on the subject, that I will return to in some up coming blog posts.

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Blog post 9/100 #Blogg100-challenge


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What is the difference between a museum object and a photograph #Blogg100

Uncertain Images (eds: Elizabeth Edwards and Sigrid Lien)

Uncertain Images (eds: Elizabeth Edwards and Sigrid Lien)

One of the most important books on photography and museums was published last year at Ashgate: Uncertain Images: Museums and the Work of photographs,  It is a book that brings ”into focus the ubiquitous yet entirely unconsidered work that photographs are put to in museums.”

Photographs have through the decades been acquired by museums, and depending on the contemporary museum practices they have changed from scientific evidence, to documentation, to art, and also representations of museum objects.

So what is the different between a museum object and a photograph in the museum collections (and why does it matter)? First photographs are rarely documented on an object level and neither digitized as single objects – this indicates a different status than the objects that are always documented individually.

Secondly they are reproducible and as such they lack originality as an historical object. , ”with their authenticity, originality and cultural capital suspect, photographs, for the most part, lie outside the systems of value that produces museum objects. They sit low in that hierarchy.”

Thirdly, they are not considered as part of the holy object collections, but rather clotted together with documents, and placed in the Museum Archive.

Despite this uncertain and ambiguous status of photographs, they are today central to the museum’s own narrative.

The book Uncertain Images challenges the lack of attention to the roles, purposes and lives of the mass of humble photographs within museums.

The digital aspect of the role of photographs in museums are, in part, adressed by myself in Chapter 13: Digital Dilemmas: The Impact of Digital Tools on Photograph Collections. More on that topic in an upcoming blog post.

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Blog post 8/100 #Blogg100 Challenge